Skip to content

Posts from the ‘FFE’ Category

Liberty

FFE

The following is written for a challenge over at Fandango’s called Fandango’s February Expression #22.

You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink

Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, will be to post a story, a poem, an image, an interpretation of what the expression means to you, or to do whatever it is that you want to do based upon the daily adage.

dog-855767_1920

Image by Mr_Incognito_ from Pixabay

 

This saying conjures up a memory from my past about a dog, a family pet, an Irish Setter named Liberty.

Quite often when I was a teen, my parents, our dog, and I would go for a car ride (usually for most of the day). That was back when you didn’t have to mortgage your house to buy gas.

Back to the point of this post…

We would always bring water and a dish for Liberty in case she got thirsty. She always refused to drink the water. When we would stop somewhere we would let her out of the car to have a bathroom break. The strange thing is that she would never relieve herself no matter how many hours we were gone. As soon as we got home however she’d race into the backyard to do her business. I don’t know how she was able to hold it for so long. Must have had a really good bladder.

 

 

 

 

A Woman’s Place is in the Home #FFE

ginger-650475_1280

Image by David D from Pixabay

A woman’s place is in the home, or a woman’s place is in the kitchen reminds me of a story my father told me long ago. He was in the Canadian Navy and was in Scotland during WWII. He’d just met a young woman and she’d taken him home to meet her parents. After the introductions were made and everyone was seated in the parlour the girls’ father sternly said to his wife, “woman, get back in the kitchen where you belong.”

This angered my father and he was about to say something when the girl grabbed onto his arm as if to say leave it alone and just let it be.

Shortly after my father said he had to get back to his ship and left.

The origin of this phrase dates back to 467 B.C., where it was said: “Let women stay at home and hold their peace.”

There were various forms of the saying over the years and in:

 November 1970, Time magazine printed a piece titled Newcomers in the House. Bella Abzug campaigned for office in the US Congress using the slogan “This woman’s place is in the House… the House of Representatives.”

 

This piece was written for Fandango’s February Expressions #6.